Jam2nd

I believe the history of marketing and design can teach us a lot, and look to find ideas and insights from the people and approaches of the past.

Top of the funnel — 3 January 2021

Top of the funnel

For those who love our lead funnels…


Get my newsletter – The Cream

If you want to keep up-to-date with everything I find and post, then sign-up for my email newsletter – The Cream.

Processing…
Success! You're on the list.
A mile in their shoes — 2 January 2021

A mile in their shoes

There is a BBC sitcom called Mrs Brown’s Boys. And the first thing you should know about it is it is very popular. It ran for 3 series from 2011 to 2013 and since then they’ve put out specials every year. Although the latest ratings were lower than previously, the team behind it recently signed to keep creating specials until 2026. Episodes have attracted audiences over 11 million people in the UK – a lot in these choice-filled times.

The other thing you should know about Mrs Brown’s Boys is… most critics think it’s terrible. And not just critics. I don’t know anyone who likes it or watches it. And out of the people I follow on various social media platforms who have seen it – they think it’s terrible and don’t know anyone who watches it or likes it.

Trying to find someone who likes Mrs Brown’s Boys is like trying to find someone who will admit to enjoying vegan cheese. If someone said to me, “tell me the appeal of Mrs Brown’s Boys,” I would shrug, suggest they looked “over there” in some vaguely indicated direction, and slink away quietly.

But it has appeal. Lots of it. Clearly not to the people I like to bump up against in a slightly awkward way, but to a different group of people. A segment. The “Mrs Brown’s Boys” segment – who also enjoy some of other terrible TV I don’t watch and have opinions that don’t align with mine or my bubble-tea-loving-bubble at all.

Being a good marketer means understanding the audience for something, even if that audience isn’t like you at all.


“Never judge a man until you’ve walked a mile in his shoes. Because then you’ll be a mile away, and you’ll have his shoes.”

Might be Jack Handey, Johnny Carson, Billy Connolly or Steve Martin, according to the internet

Get my newsletter – The Cream

If you want to keep up-to-date with everything I find and post, then sign-up for my email newsletter – The Cream.

Processing…
Success! You're on the list.
We be podcastin’ — 24 October 2019

We be podcastin’

Recently I was interviewed on the Upp B2B podcast – Uppwards. Uppwards - B2B Marketing podcast Covering marketing automation, the buying process, and a good helping of behavioural economic theory. Listen now >


Hey, now you’ve read this why don’t we connect? You can find me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Or you can signup for The Cream, my semi-regular email round-up of writings and findings sent via Substack:

(I wont do anything else with your data, as I am unimaginitive)


Your next hire should be a grizzled, old marketing veteran — 30 June 2017

Your next hire should be a grizzled, old marketing veteran

Sometimes things are better when they’re older. Wine, perhaps. Whiskey. Cars (have you seen cars from the 50s?). Houses (we had a plasterer round who I discussed the concept of “character” with – we came to the conclusion it’s wonky bits).

And sometimes things are better when they’re younger (or newer). Underwear. Milk. Toilet seats. Continue reading

Getting away with it — 29 June 2016

Getting away with it

“Three Aldi adverts claiming customers could make significant savings were misleading, the Advertising Standards Authority has ruled.

A TV advert claimed a £70 Aldi shop would cost £98 at the “big four” supermarkets.

Morrisons and two members of the public complained the adverts did not make it clear Aldi’s own-brand products were being compared with branded products.”

From the BBC website.

Is the idea of marketing to get away with as much as you can? It feels like that sometimes.

We say that trust is important. But then we behave like it isn’t if it gets in the way of some scheme or other. Continue reading

%d bloggers like this: